Courses

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Courses for Spring 2019

ARTH 101 – Intro Ancient – Medieval WF 11:00-12:15, Walsh 495 Prof. Tilney

Major monuments of western art from the prehistoric birth of representational art through the thirteenth century, with emphasis on ancient and medieval civilizations of Europe and the Mediterranean basin. A number of seats are reserved for freshmen and sophomores.

ARTH 102 – Intro Renaissance-Modern WF 12:30-1:45, Walsh 495 Prof. Tilney

Major achievements in European and American pictorial art, sculpture, and architecture from the early Renaissance through the early twenty-first century. Emphasis is on functions, meanings, and styles of individual works within a historical context. A number of seats are reserved for freshmen and sophomores.

ARTH 140 – Modern Art MW 12:30-1:45, Walsh 495 Staff

This course provides a broad survey of modern European and American art, with a focus on the development of abstraction. We will examine the major art movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, while remaining ever attentive to the question of what is modern art. Artistic developments will be understood in relation to historical factors, such as the impact of revolution and war, the changing status of women, and the rise of the modern metropolis. Together we will read seminal art theoretical texts which grapple with the nature of modernity, the role of the arts in the modern period, and the rise of the modern art museum.
*for ARTH majors, fulfills the Modern/Contemporary distribution requirement
**for ARTH minors, fulfills the post-1600 distribution requirement

ARTH 229 – Global Early Modern Art MW 9:30-10:45, Walsh 495 Prof. Nalezyty

The terms “global” and “early modern” both provide a theoretical context for approaching the period between 1400 and1800. “Global” follows geographic boundaries and emphasizes regional and transregional influences along cultural, economic, religious, and political lines. “Early modern” spans from 1400 to 1800, which encompasses the Renaissance and Baroque styles in Western art. This course begins with that European context and expands its scope, asking the simple question: What was happening simultaneously in the world during this time? For example, Japanese Zen Buddhist monks built their dry landscape Rock Garden in their temple in Kyoto a few years before Leonardo da Vinci began painting his last supper. Using art, architecture, and visual culture as points of entry, we will compare and contrast the artistic, historical, and stylistic contexts of cultural monuments from Europe, the Islamic Empires (Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals), the Americas(Aztec, Incan, and Mississippian cultures), India, China’s Ming dynasty, and Japan’s Muromachi period, among others. The emerging acknowledgment of a global context will be explored by studying transcultural material, maps, scientific instruments, and contemporary dress. And finally, we will look at European art and artifact collections, which sought to assemble exotic and disparate items together, so visitors could learn of this newly discovered world, conveniently and all in one place.
*for ARTH majors, fulfills the Renaissance/Baroque distribution requirement
**for ARTH minors, fulfills the pre-1600 distribution requirement

ARTH 235 – History of Prints TR 9:30-10:45, Walsh 495 Prof. Acres

This course surveys the history of prints (mainly reproducible images on paper) in Europe and the United States c. 1400 – the present. Although they are sometimes treated as a secondary art, prints were absolutely central to the development of postmedieval western art and society. As relatively inexpensive, multiplied objects, they fundamentally reshaped ideas about what images could look like, mean, and accomplish. The role of prints in the cultivation and spread of new ideas, an international art market, propaganda, social commentary, and much more is immeasurable. The course will combine two main approaches: 1) the distinctive history of printmaking, including origins, evolution of techniques, and the political, religious, and cultural functions of prints; and 2) individual artistic developments with emphasis on the work of influential printmakers, changing iconography, and formal innovations. Among major artists to be addressed in some depth are Dürer, Rembrandt, Goya, Picasso, and Johns. We will make use of the extraordinary wealth of prints in Washington collections, including visits to the Print Study Room of the National Gallery of Art and Georgetown University’s Special Collections.
*for ARTH majors, fulfills the Renaissance/Baroque distribution requirement
**for ARTH minors, fulfills the pre-1600 distribution requirement

TH 252 – American Art to 1970 TR 12:30-1:45, Walsh 495 Prof. Strong

This course will explore painting, sculpture, photography, and some decorative arts produced in the United States from the colonial era through 1970. It will address central themes in the history of American art within the broader context of American political and cultural history. Topics include art production in the colonial periphery, the role of the artist in American society, landscape and nationalism, the encounter of western and non-western art traditions, and the impact of art in shaping notions of race, class, and gender. The course will include visits to local museums such as the Smithsonian American Art Museum, National Museum of the American Indian, the Phillips Collection, the Freer|Sackler, or the National Gallery of Art.
*for ARTH majors, fulfills the Modern/Contemporary distribution requirement
**for ARTH minors, fulfills the post-1600 distribution requirement

ARTH 357 – American Sublime TR 11:00-12:15, Walsh 495 Prof. Prelinger

This lecture course examines the transmutation of 18th-century European philosophical and aesthetic notions of the sublime, the Beautiful and the Picturesque into distinctly American art and literature. Through considering American 19th-century paintings by such artists as Thomas Cole and Albert Bierstadt, and literary selections from such poets and novelists such as William Cullen Bryant and Herman Melville, we will explore ways in which nature became America’s version of the transcendental experience of the Sublime. Moreover, this focus on nature held serious implications for the formation of American character and national destiny, issues that have taken on particular urgency in our own times. Field trips will take us to the National Gallery of Art and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
*for ARTH majors, fulfills the Modern/Contemporary distribution requirement
**for ARTH minors, fulfills the post-1600 distribution requirement

ARTH 375 – Art of the Silk Routes MW 11:00-12:15, Walsh 398 Prof. Wang

This course focuses on the cultural heritage of the overland and maritime silk routes. The silk routes served as a conduit for commercial trade and cultural exchange between China, Central Asia, India, and Southeast Asia, and Europe. In addition to mural paintings in the Buddhist cave shrines of northwestern China, we will also study portable paintings, manuscripts, textiles, ceramics, and architecture. We will put these artifacts into context by imagining how they interfaced with the rulers, monks, traders, and nomads who traveled and lived along the silk routes.
*for ARTH majors, fulfills the Non-European/American distribution requirement
**for ARTH minors, fulfills the pre-1600 distribution requirement

ARTH 418 – Mesoamerican Art: Myth Ritual T 2:00-4:30, Walsh 399 Prof. Huezo

The course examines the arts of Mesoamerica up to the time of the European conquest. Organized chronologically, students analyze and discuss artworks associated with the major cultures of Mesoamerica, including Olmec, Maya, and Aztec.Additionally, by studying Mesoamerican codices (Mixtec, Maya, and Aztec), the course explores Mixtec mythological events and dynastic history; Maya ritual cycles concerned with religion and cosmogony; and Aztec pantheism, historical events, conquests, and daily life. While placing particular emphasis on religion, race, gender, politics, and the performative aspects of rituals, the course introduces students to the major theoretical concepts regarding Mesoamerican art and its interpretation. Open to juniors and seniors; a number of seats reserved for graduate students.
**for ARTH minors, fulfills the pre-1600 distribution requirement

ARTH 430 – GU: Architecture & History R 2:00-4:30, Walsh 399 Prof. Rufino

This seminar will provide an in-depth look into Georgetown University’s architectural development over time. Beginning in the eighteenth century and moving to contemporary campus developments, students will explore iconic buildings and landscape changes. Among the many structures, we will investigate are Dahlgren Chapel, Healy Hall, Isaac Hawkins Hall, their Barn, Observatory and Lauinger Library. Structures will be studied within their cultural context with issues relating to the country’s broader political environment, university leadership and slavery playing an integral role in our study. We will also note various unrealized campus building plans. Wider developments in American university architecture will be discussed. This course will provide students with outstanding practical research experience as our work will parallel the development of a Georgetown campus guidebook. This course requires no prior knowledge of architectural history and will introduce students to general building styles via university examples. Open to juniors and seniors; a number of seats reserved for graduate students.
**for ARTH minors, fulfills the post-1600 distribution requirement

ARTH 457 – Symbolism W 2:00-4:30, Walsh 397 Prof. Prelinger

Exoticism, decadence, and the occult penetrate the mysterious images of late-nineteenth-century artists like Gustave Moreau, Odilon Redon, and Edvard Munch. Centering on France, this seminar will examine issues of the Symbolist movement through the study of Symbolist theory, paintings, poetry, prints, and primary documents. Among the problems to be addressed are: the attempt to define a Symbolist art; the distinction between Symbolism and art nouveau; the differences between symbol and allegory; the question of whether or not there was a Symbolist style; and strategies for creating Symbolist art. We will have a session at the Print and Drawings Study Room at the National Gallery of Art and possibly other field trips.Open to juniors and seniors; a number of seats reserved for graduate students.
**for ARTH minors, fulfills the post-1600 distribution requirement

ARTH 466 – Body in Asian Art M 2:00-4:30, Walsh 397 Prof. Wang

It has often been assumed that representation of the human form did not play as significant a role in the development of East Asian art as it did in the Western tradition. In this seminar, we will address this issue by exploring various approaches to the issue of corporeality in the art of China and Japan that not only focus upon representation of the human body, but that also question the ways in which discourse about the body was related to larger questions about death and the afterlife, the sacred and the profane, the human and the artificial, and the articulation of national identity. Selected case studies for weekly topics may range from the famed terracotta warriors to imperial portraiture, along with an exploration of calligraphy, cyborgs, and performance art. While the course will focus primarily on premodern art, students are invited to consider issues concerning the body, gender, and personhood in modern and contemporary contexts. No prior knowledge of Asianart is required or assumed. Open to juniors and seniors; a number of seats reserved for graduate students.Open to juniors and seniors; a number of seats reserved for graduate students.
**for ARTH minors, fulfills the pre-1600 distribution requirement

Cross-listed Course

CLSS 110 – Intro to Greek Art and Archaeology TR 11:00-12:15 Prof. Keesling

This course offers both a chronological survey of ancient Greek material culture and an introduction to the methods ofdiscovery and analysis employed by Classical (Greek and Roman) archaeologists. Most class meetings will focus on the majormonuments, archaeological sites, art works, and other artifacts of the ancient Greek world fromBronze Age prehistory through to the Archaic (ca. 600-480 B.C.), Classical (ca. 480-323 B.C.), and Hellenistic (ca. 323-30B.C.) periods. In addition to considering major sites such as Knossos, Mycenae, Athens, Delphi, and Olympia, we will trace thedevelopment of Greek architecture, sculpture, city planning, painting, and other art forms over time.We will also consider the nature of the archaeological evidence for the ancient Greeks and the relationship of Classicalarchaeology to other disciplines such as art history, history, and the classical languages. Midterm and final exams will bebased upon slides seen in class and available through Powerpoint presentations; students will research and write two shortpapers.